Saturday Slow Cooker Chicken Tacos

You guys. I NEED new content, stat. This is the last recipe/bunch of photos I’ve got stockpiled – I’m not 100% positive, but I don’t think there’s anything lurking on my SD cards. I’m hosting Friendsgiving this weekend so I’ll be able to wrangle a post or two out of that but I need to get cracking on some new material. Problem is, I’m at a loss of what to post. So if there’s anything you’d like to see/hear about feel free comment here or on my Facebook page!

Two weekends ago my bestie and I had a girls’ day that included brunch, apple picking at a local orchard, and then heading back home to have some dinner and watch college football.

The apple picking was a lot of fun, even if it was an unseasonably hot 82 degrees in October.

I wore my cute fall boots anyway, damn it. Those apples are amazing by the way. If you’re local I highly recommend trying Grim’s Orchard. They’ve got fun activities for little ones too. (Note: I said fun. I did not say cheap.)

Before we headed out for the day, however, I threw dinner together in the crockpot so it would be ready when we go back to the house. Sara and I are big taco fans, so the choice of what to make was a no-brainer. And these shredded chicken tacos are so easy to throw together that the most amount of work involved is cutting up and organizing all the toppings when you’re ready to serve.

Side note: I have the Ninja 3-in-1 Cooking System, which allows me to sear/saute/bake/etc. so my instructions are specific to my that appliance. If you have a regular slow cooker, you can just throw everything in it, turn it on high, and let it go for 4-5 hours.

To prepare the chicken: Slice a medium onion, thinly. Pour 2 Tbs olive oil into the cooker on the saute setting (high heat), and add the onion. Stir and allow onions to sweat – they will soften and become slightly translucent. Add 2-3 chicken breasts directly to the surface of the cooker and sear for a minute. Season with salt, pepper, ground cumin, ground coriander, and chili powder. Pour a small bottle of enchilada sauce and a jar of salsa over the chicken.

I also added a small sprinkle of brown sugar to cut the acidity of the salsa and enchilada sauce. Honey or agave syrup would work here as well. Cover, and change heat setting to slow cook over high heat. Go about your day for at least four hours. Brunch to your hearts’ content. Go apple picking and complain about the heat. Buy all the apple things, plus tasty kettle corn. Go shopping for some new Penn State (or the college of your choice) gear.

Then come home to a house that smells of taco amazingness, and shred that chicken to bits using a couple of forks.  Reduce heat to warm. Taste and adjust for seasoning.

For the pineapple salsa, peel and core a pineapple, and dice up about 1/2 of it. Finely dice 1/2 a small red onion, 1/2 a jalapeno pepper (more or less depending on your desired spice level), mince one clove of garlic, and a squeeze of lime juice. Stir together and set aside. (You can add some fresh cilantro to this, but I prefer to serve cilantro separately when I’m making tacos for more than just me — not everyone enjoys it)

Arrange all the rest of your toppings – I had the pineapple salsa, shredded cheese, hot sauce, chopped cilantro, pico de gallo, a little guacamole (leftover from the chips and guac we snacked on before dinner), sour cream, and some small lime quarters. Heat up your tortillas of choice (I’m a soft flour kinda girl myself), and serve.

Enjoy along with your adult beverage of choice and some college football.

And perhaps a cupcake. 🙂

 

Easy Slow Cooker Chicken Tacos with Pineapple Salsa

  • 3 boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 jar chunky salsa
  • 1 bottle enchilada sauce
  • 2 TB olive oil
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 2 TB brown sugar, honey, or agave syrup
  • tortillas and toppings of your choice

Turn the slow cooker on to high heat/saute. Cut the onion in half, peel, and slice thinly. Add the olive oil to the cooker and allow to become slightly softened and translucent. Add the chicken to the slow cooker and the seasonings. Sear the chicken for a couple minutes, add the salsa and enchilada sauce, switch heat setting to high/slow cook, and allow to cook for 4-5 hours.

Shred chicken with two forks and reduce setting to warm. Serve with preferred toppings. See pineapple salsa recipe below.

Pineapple Salsa 

  • 1/2 ripe pineapple
  • 1/2 small red onion
  • 1/2 jalapeno (more or less as desired)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • lime juice
  • salt

Peel and core pineapple. Chop into smaller diced pieces. Dice onion. De-seed and dice jalapeno(depending on desired heat level). Mince garlic. Toss all into a bowl with lime juice and a pinch of salt. Serve with tacos, chips, or anything else you like.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

Corn and Crab Chowder

As soon as September 1st rolls around it begins. Jack Skellington memes on Facebook. Reports of Pumpkin Spice everything at the grocery store. Young women who just spent the summer in sun dresses and sandals are digging out their boots, flannels, and puffy vests. “OMG it’s finally FALL!”

Except it isn’t. Not really. Not in Pennsylvania. We had sunny, hot, summer-like 80 degree weather until…

Like a week and a half ago. I was still sleeping with my air conditioner on. It was maddening, especially given the crappy rainy summer we did have. But now, finally, MIDWAY THROUGH OCTOBER, fall has arrived. Leaves are changing, the air is crisp and cool and I’m craving soup pretty much 24/7.

This is a great soup to make during late summer/early fall, when the corn harvest is still abundant. You can make this any time of year with frozen corn, but fresh corn is fantastic with the crab meat and bacon in the chowder.

You will need: Corn, fresh lump crab meat, bacon, four medium potatoes, one large onion, two to four cloves of garlic, one large bell pepper (or 1/2 to 3/4 each of two medium sized ones), vegetable stock, seafood stock jelly packet (optional, you could use a carton of seafood stock if you have it available), fresh parsley, heavy cream, and seasoning.

Note: This isn’t a “chowder” in the strictest sense of the word, because it’s not super thick or rich  – I don’t add flour to the fat with the cooked vegetables to make a roux before adding the stock. You absolutely can do so if you prefer a richer soup. I’ve always just made it this way and I really enjoy it. 

Start by heating a large soup pot over medium heat, and cut four strips of bacon into large dice. Add the bacon to the hot pot and cook until browned and crispy. Remove the bacon from the pot and drain on paper towels.

Snack on a piece or two, I won’t tell. Dice the onion and bell peppers and add them to the rendered bacon fat in the pot and saute until translucent and soft. Mince the garlic, add to pot, and saute until fragrant. Add a little salt and pepper and some onion and garlic powder if you like.

While the vegetables are sauteing, remove the corn from the cobs and dice the potatoes into small bite size pieces. Add the corn and potatoes to the pot, along with the seafood stock jelly and vegetable stock, and increase the heat to medium-high.

This isn’t a necessary ingredient; you can just buy liquid seafood stock, or use plain vegetable or chicken stock(low sodium) if you prefer. I just tried this to see if it made a difference in flavor – I think this definitely made the chowder more “fishy” than when I’ve made it in the past.

Allow the vegetables and stock to come to a low boil, reduce heat back down to medium, and simmer until the potatoes are cooked through. While the soup is simmering, drain the crab meat and pick through to make sure there are no pieces of shell left in the meat.

Fresh lump crab meat is best here – don’t scrimp on this ingredient. It’s a bit pricey but sometimes you can hit a good seafood sale at your local grocery store.

When the potatoes are fork tender, add the crab meat to the soup along with the cooked bacon. Stir together and allow to simmer 5-10 minutes so the flavors mingle. Add 1/2 pint of heavy cream and 2 tablespoons of fresh chopped parsley. Check seasonings and serve.

Corn and Crab Chowder

  • 4 or 5 ears fresh corn on the cob, husked and kernels removed
  • 4 medium potatoes, peeled and diced (can leave peels on, just scrub well)
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced (I used 1/2 red pepper and 1/2 orange pepper, but use whatever you prefer)
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 slices of bacon cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 lb fresh lump crab mean, drained and any remaining bits of shell removed
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • seafood stock jelly
  • 1/2 pint heavy cream
  • 2 Tbs fresh parsley, minced
  • salt and pepper to taste

In a large stock pot, cook the chopped bacon over medium heat until crispy. Remove and drain on paper towels and set aside. Saute the onion and bell pepper in the remaining bacon drippings (add a little olive oil or butter if you need more fat for sauteing) until translucent. Add minced garlic and saute for one minute more. ~This is where you would add a tablespoon of flour to the fat to thicken the soup if you prefer.~

Add corn, diced potatoes, and seafood stock jelly to the vegetables and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Add vegetable stock to the pot and allow to come to a slow boil. Reduce heat, cover with lid and simmer until the potatoes are just cooked through. Add crab meat and bacon to the pot and simmer for another 5 minutes. Stir in cream and parsley and adjust seasonings to taste, if necessary.

Serve with crackers and enjoy!

A Common-Sense Guide to Musikfest 2017

If you’re a resident of the Lehigh Valley (and haven’t spent the last few weeks under a rock), you are aware that Musikfest starts this Friday, August 4th. For those not in the know, Musikfest is a ten-day music festival featuring dozens of acts, crafts, street performers, beer, and more fried food than you’d be able to eat in a month. It’s kind of a big deal in this area and I’m definitely a fan. I’ve attended regularly for about seven or eight years now and I usually make it to the festival multiple nights during the ten days (ridiculous work schedule notwithstanding).

I don’t consider myself to be some sort of Musikfest professional, but I’d like to think I’m pretty well versed in the ins and outs of ‘Festing, so I decided to share some helpful tips and tricks that I’ve learned along the way.

A Primer: Musikfest takes up a good portion of Bethlehem, PA, with stages on both the north and south sides of town. The big ticket acts only play on the Southside, so if you only have plans to see Live, Santana or Toby Keith (Why tho?), I’d suggest parking on the Southside to save yourself the headache of navigating your way over from Broad Street. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Musikfest has multiple stages, called Platzes, at which many acts play during each day at the festival. The majority of the Platzes are on the Northside, and I recommend starting your day over there, if not spending all day in that area. You can always hop on the North-South shuttle if there’s a specific act you wanted to see on the Southside. Walking is an option but with the Fahy Bridge (still) under massive construction, I’d avoid it if possible.

Before you go:

Get in the know. Download the app, grab a progam at Artsquest , or familiarize yourself with the Musikfest website. The more informed you are before you arrive the better. You’ll get info on band schedules, where to park and grab the North-South shuttle, where to fill your mug, and where to find your corn.

Follow my friend The El Vee, if you aren’t already(He’s on Facebook too). In addition to his awesome yearly pre-Fest guide(including where to get the best craft and local brew mug fills), his daily recommendations for must-see acts will help make the best of the “music” portion of your Musikfest experience, and his recaps will let you know which acts to look out for next year, if you missed them.

Buy a Mug. Even if you’re only going one day. Get a damn mug(or borrow an old one from a friend). If you’re planning on buying more than one beer it’ll save you a little cash. You can snag one of the fancy-pants light up mugs, but they cost like two bucks more, plus they’re a pain in the ass to wash. Go for the regular mugs; they’re much easier to throw in the dishwasher in the morning to wash the beer funk out. You can snag one at Artsquest or a local Wegmans this week before the festival even starts.

Get Comfortable. Musikfest takes place in August in Pennsylvania. It’s notoriously hot and humid this time of the year. Wear comfortable, light clothes and sturdy shoes good for walking. If you carry a purse I recommend a cross-body type to keep your hands free, and if possible, pick up a large carabineer to clip your mug to your bag or belt when not in use. 

Come Prepared, but Travel Light. Bring only the necessities. Will you need cash? Yes, absolutely. Bring your ID and ATM cards too. A small bottle of anti-bacterial hand sanitizer or small pack of baby wipes will help keep your hands clean after using the porta-potties, and if you plan on taking a lot of photos, videos, or spend the day SnapChatting, a portable power bank isn’t a bad idea. If you’re prone to aches, pains, and heartburn like me, bring a small bottle of Tylenol or pack of antacids. At the very least have them available back at your vehicle along with Band-Aids and other first aid supplies, and maybe a cooler with icy cold bottles of water for the drive home.

Suck It Up and Pay For Parking. Unless you arrive hella early or get hella lucky, you’re not going to find a free parking space anywhere near the festival grounds. So park about a mile and a half away and get to stepping, park at one of the shuttle lots and bus in, or pay $10 to park in one of the city lots. Many local businesses/churches offer parking for about $5-7, but aren’t monitored by security, so park there at your own risk.

Food and Drink: Musikfest has a ton of food and drink tents that operate with a ticket system. Northside vendors are strictly ticket-only, while Southside vendors accept both tickets and cash. There are multiple tents that sell tickets all over, right alongside the food and beer tents. Ticket tents accept cash and credit/debit cards for convenience (Buy more than you think you’ll need, trust me on this). There are plenty of businesses on Main Street that sell food and drinks without tickets, but that money doesn’t go to fund Musikfest. Plus why would you go into the heart ‘Fest and eat at Mama Nina’s instead of Take a Taco?

 reactions wtf britney spears confused huh GIF
I mean, no shade on Mama Nina’s but they’re open year ’round. Musikfest is only here for ten days. GET THE TACO. Or the gyro. Or any other of the dozens of different delicious delicacies available.

Many businesses offer mug refills at a reduced rate; this is an option to consider if you’re planning on doing any serious drinking at ‘Fest. (Make sure you have a DD, please. Or snag an Uber home.) If you’re good with drinking Miller Light, Yuengling or Coors, most businesses on Broad will fill your mug on the cheap; Musikfest charges at least 7-8$. Some places offer craft and local brews; you can obviously expect to pay a little more for that quality of beverage where available. Side note: Your mug holds non-alcoholic beverages just as well. A little cold water to stay hydrated wouldn’t hurt.

My Food Picks: You can never go wrong with Take a Taco, Pretzel Revolution, Hogar Crea Shish Kabobs, Aw Shucks corn, and Island Noodles. A giant ice cream sandwich from Bethlehem Dairy Store (AKA The Cup) is always a good idea. There are a few new vendors this year that I’m looking forward to scoping out, but I’ll let The El Vee tell you about them (He’s done more research, trust me). On a really hot day a frozen tropical smoothie is a great idea too (and if your mug happens to have rum in it when you get the smoothie? BONUS.).

Have Fun. Don’t Be A Jerk. Yes, there’s booze aplenty. Yes, there’s a ton of people, and yes, it’s really freaking hot. It’s no excuse to act like an ass and get yourself in trouble with the local law enforcement. Have fun, get crazy, but be respectful of the town and other ‘Fest-goers. Also, yes, it’s expensive. Yes, it’s stupid crowded. Yes, it used to be cheaper. And YES, the mugs used to hold more beer. Times change, prices change. There’s nothing we can do about it, so just enjoy while you can. Musikfest only happens once a year, there’s no sense in being miserable about it.

 

See you at ‘Fest!

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

Lightened Up Buffalo Chicken Meatballs (21 Day Fix-Friendly)

The problem with posting so sporadically to one’s blog is that one doesn’t always remember what one posted last before starting the next post. Hence, the back-to-back buffalo chicken-themed dishes.

We’ll just have to push through.

Since April I’ve been participating in a health and fitness accountability group on Facebook. If you’re on Facebook at all I’m sure you’ve heard of them. If not; they’re organized via Beachbody “Coaches” that post daily challenges, inspiration, and encourage you to check in with your daily workouts and food logs. And in case you’ve been living under a rock, Beachbody is the company that floods your early morning television with infomercials for programs like 21 Day Fix, Cize, P90X, etc.

I’ve been taking it slow, especially in the beginning because of a knee injury this past spring, but now I’m fully on board with a cardio kickboxing-type workout called TurboFire and I follow the 21 Day Fix container system diet. It has really helped me get back on track with my weight loss, which sadly fell off course last year. Say what you will about multi-level marketing type business; it’s working for me so I’m sticking with it.

The main goal of the 21 Day Fix eating plan is “Clean Eating”; no white flour, no sugar, no processed foods, very limited dairy, organic produce and meats (when possible). This has been an adjustment for sure – I haven’t been a big consumer of processed/boxed foods in a long time, but flour? Sugar? Artificial sweeteners? NO DAIRY ARE YOU SERIOUS? BUT CHEESE, MAN. (Well, 21 DF does allow a few cheeses in a small amount). To make this change has definitely been a challenge, but I’m adjusting well. There are a couple things I refuse to give up – namely the sweetener and half and half in my morning coffee. Since I drink two cups a day at most, I figure what Autumn  doesn’t know won’t kill her.

To keep in line with my new eating plan I’ve researched lots of recipes online (Pinterest is a big help with this), and thanks to my challenge groups I won Autumn’s book of recipes called Fixate (honestly, the recipes in that are great, even if you’re not following the plan). I’ve also started remaking some of my go-to recipes along the 21 DF guidelines. This was one of my first successful forays into “Fixifying” an old favorite, buffalo chicken meatballs. The original recipe wasn’t that bad, with the exception of the butter in the sauce, but when you serve the meatballs alongside super creamy ranch or blue cheese dressing, it’s a no-go. So I made a (semi) Fix-Approved dip to accompany the meatballs as well.

You just mix some ground chicken up with whole wheat bread crumbs, grated onion, one egg, parsley, and seasonings, form into balls with your hands (or a mini ice cream scoop), and bake.

While the meatballs are baking stir together greek yogurt, white vinegar, spices, and a small amount of blue cheese crumbles and set aside. Note: Blue cheese isn’t specifically allowed on the Fix, but it’s such a small amount and you’re only using 2 TB or so of the dip, so. Pick your battles, I guess.

Melt a tablespoon of coconut oil in a pan and stir it together with your favorite hot sauce. Toss the meatballs in the hot sauce mixture.

And serve immediately, with the dipping sauce and some veggies on the side.

Who needs wings? Not this lady.

Lightened Up Buffalo Chicken Meatballs with Blue Cheese Dip

Servings: approx. 5, 6 mini meatballs each

  • 1 lb ground chicken
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 c whole wheat bread crumbs (I had panko style on hand)
  • 1/2 medium onion, grated
  • 1/4 c. parsley, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 TB (unrefined extra virgin) coconut oil
  • 1/3 c hot sauce (I use Frank’s)

Mix all ingredients together well. Form into balls (use a mini ice cream scoop, if you have one) and place onto a baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray (coconut oil preferred). Bake at 375 degrees for 15-18 minutes or until cooked through. Melt coconut oil in a large pan and add hot sauce. Stir together to combine completely. Add cooked meatballs and toss in the sauce to coat well. Serve with dipping sauce and vegetables of choice.

Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce

  • 2/3 c fat free greek yogurt
  • 3 TB white vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 tsp paprika
  • 2 dashes Worschestershire sauce
  • 1/3 cup crumbled blue cheese

Mix all ingredients together, stir to combine. Serve with meatballs (approx 2 TB per serving)

 

As far as container counts are concerned for you 21 Day Fixers: I am not affiliated with Autumn Calabrese or her master nutritionists. I am just a lil baby blogger, and this is by no means 100% accurate so don’t take my word for it: I’m calling one serving of 6 meatballs with one green container’s worth of veggies and 2 TB of dip: 1 Red, 1 Green, and 1 Orange. Possibly 1 t but that’s debatable. Not counting a blue either, since it’s such a small amount of cheese in the dip. (I know those blues are precious!)

 

Cocktail Friday(on a Monday): Raspberry Beret

Like many people, I’ve had Prince playing on a constant loop in my house and car since Thursday. He was an artist I always enjoyed and admired, and I don’t think we’ll ever see someone like him again, sadly.

I encourage you to tip this one back in his honor.

The Raspberry Beret

  • 2 oz Raspberry Vodka
  • 1 oz. Chambord blackberry liqueur
  • 1 oz. St. Germaine Elderflower liqueur
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • raspberries for garnish

Add vodka, liqueurs, and lemon juice to a shaker filled with ice. Shake and strain into chilled martini glass. Garnish with raspberries. Play “Let’s Go Crazy” and dance like a lunatic.

 

“Italian Sub” Salad

Well that was an unexpected absence. The past four months since I last posted have gone by in an absolute blur and I have absolutely nothing to show for it, besides my muffin top.

Stress eating is a hell of a thing.

ANYWAY.

I used to work in the deli department of a small grocery store in the Pocono Mountains. For those of you not familiar with the Poconos (And there’s like ten of you that read this blog regularly, I know you’re familiar with the Poconos. This is for the OTHER ten people that might stumble upon my ramblings and need a little back story, I’m saying.), there is a large population of people that have transplanted from New Jersey and New York to the area over the past 30 years or so  and have made it their home.

With New Yorkers and New Jersians (Jersey-ites?) come New York and New Jersey foods. Excellent pizza, Italian bakeries, bagels, and delis are all over Monroe County, and the deli I worked in was…

Eh, it was alright. It was cramped and the floor was sticky sometimes and it was a revolving door of college-aged losers (OH HAYYYYYYY) that were too young to go to the bars every night but needed money for the movies and Chinese food. We made awesome homemade salads and gigantic sandwiches and sold good cold cuts. I mean the really good ones.

I blame this job for my deli and sandwich snobbery and that pesky 50 lb weight gain after high school. (Hey, it had to come from somewhere, y’all.) To this day, I refuse to buy cold cuts from certain stores, and am very particular about the Italian subs I order.

The subs we made back in that deli were great – meat, cheese, and veggies stuffed to almost bursting on soft, chewy Italian rolls delivered to us every morning. Our Italian subs were my personal favorite – black pepper-coated ham, spicy Capicola ham (or Gabbagool, as my regulars would call it), hard salami, and sharp provolone cheese. I always preferred mine with lettuce, tomato, a couple hot peppers, and lots of oil and vinegar. Oh, dudes. You think Wawa‘s Italian subs are good? PFFT. Wawa ain’t got nothing on these. (But FYI Primo‘s Sharp Italians are pretty close.)

Unfortunately, the store I used to work in burned down a few years back and was never rebuilt. So you may never know the delight that is a Hilltop Market Italian sub made by yours truly. But you can have this salad, which might be a close second.

Gather your ingredients:

Romaine lettuce, cherry tomatoes, red onion, pepper ham, hard salami, capicola ham, provolone cheese, sandwich pepperoni, and jarred hot pepperoncini peppers. For the dressing, a little mayo, white vinegar, salt, pepper, and a mess of grated parmesan cheese.

First, the dressing.

Mayo, vinegar, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Add grated parmesan. Whisk violently.

Okay, maybe not violently. Set aside.

Chop up romaine, slice cherry tomatoes in half, slice onion thinly. Add to large bowl.

Like so.

Prepare the cold cuts by layering the pepper ham, capicola, salami, provolone, and pepperoni on top of each other. Roll the entire thing like a log, and slice.

Thusly.

Assemble your Avengers salad: Place sliced rolled cold cuts on the lettuce mixture, and add sliced pepperoncinis. (Or don’t, if you don’t like delicious hot things. No judgement.)

Yes.

Drizzle with creamy parmesan dressing. Serve.

You can add or subtract any cold cut you desire, use different dressing, add some good crunchy/chewy croutons, etc. It’s kind of hard to mess up a salad, no? Unless you use bad cold cuts. Then I don’t know you.

“Italian Sub” Salad with Creamy Parmesan Dressing

  • 1 head romaine lettuce, shredded
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1/2 small red onion, sliced thinly
  • Sliced black pepper ham
  • Sliced spicy capicola ham
  • Sliced hard salami
  • Sliced pepperoni (look for sandwich or “slicing” pepperoni, not the small slices for pizza
  • Jarred hot pepperoncini peppers

Toss lettuce, tomato, and onion in a large bowl. Stack sliced cold cuts and cheese. Roll into a log and slice. Top salad with rolled cold cuts and pepperoncinis. Top with dressing and serve.

Dressing:

  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 2-3 Tb white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup grated parmiggiano-reggiano cheese
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper.

Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl and pour over salad (use more or less vinegar to get desired consistency).

This is so easy and delicious it almost feels wrong.

 

 

 

 

 

Cocktail Friday: Pomegranate Moscow Mule

I was out and about for a few hours today. I had to run a few errands, including getting fingerprinted (yep) for both jobs, and picking up the boxes of floor tiles I ordered for the kitchen. Yes, I have a new kitchen floor going in soon! I’m so excited. When my dad and I remodeled the kitchen a few years ago I liked the wood laminate that I originally chose for the floor, but it quickly became apparent that it was a poor choice in the kitchen. The new flooring is a vinyl tile that can be laid and grouted like ceramic – my parents actually have it in their kitchen, and I love it. I can’t wait to get started on mine – as soon as dad can find a free weekend!

While I was out today I took a side trip to TJ Maxx “just to see what they had” and ended up buying a pair of copper mugs, something I’d been wanting to procure for a while. I ended up buying a couple other things, too, but we’re not here to talk about my fabulous new poncho and scarf.

Because with copper mugs come Moscow Mules. Vodka, lime, and ginger beer? Oh, heck yes. When you add pomegranate soda? Even better. The soda cuts the spiciness of the ginger beer and gives the drink a fruity sweetness that makes you forget you maybe shouldn’t drink it that fast, Jenn. But you do anyway, because it’s delicious.

Pomegranate Moscow Mule

2 oz vodka

1 oz lime juice

3 oz ginger beer

3 oz pomegranate soda

Fill a glass (or copper mug) with ice, add vodka, lemon juice, ginger beer, and soda. Stir and serve. And try not to chug it.